Digital Supply Chain

Digitisation Meets Sustainability: CBIP Logistics' Approach to Supply Chain

March 13, 2023 Tom Raftery / Nick Bartlett Season 1 Episode 300
Digital Supply Chain
Digitisation Meets Sustainability: CBIP Logistics' Approach to Supply Chain
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Show Notes Transcript

Hey everyone, in today's episode (episode 300!!!) of the Digital Supply Chain podcast, I had the pleasure of speaking with Nick Bartlett, the CEO of CBIP Logistics. Nick and I talked about everything from logistics to e-commerce, and I learned so much from our conversation.

Nick is a real expert in the field of supply chain management, and he shared some incredible insights about how CBIP Logistics is helping businesses like Deliveroo streamline their operations and reach new heights of success.

One of the key takeaways from our conversation was how CBIP Logistics is offering a unique operating model that sets it apart from other logistics companies. With a focus on digitalization and sustainability, they're providing their clients with a one-stop-shop for all their logistics needs.

Nick also talked about how CBIP Logistics has worked with Deliveroo over the past five years, and how they've helped them grow from a few hundred delivery points to over 5,000 today. It was amazing to hear about all the different facets of Deliveroo's business, from restaurant fulfillment to inventory management, and how CBIP Logistics has helped support them every step of the way.

If you're interested in learning more about CBIP Logistics or Nick, be sure to check out their website at CBIPLogistics.com. There's a wealth of information there about their digital products, sustainability policies, and more. You can also connect with Nick on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Thanks again to Nick for taking the time to speak with me today. I hope you all enjoyed this episode of the Digital Supply Chain podcast as much as I did. Until next time, stay safe and keep on innovating!

Don't forget this podcast is also now available on YouTube, so feel free to check it out there too.

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Nick Bartlett:

we're also seeing obviously the rise of, the social mediums and, and the likes of TikTok and, and how these kind of, you know, millennial based platforms are influencing how people purchase. And really, like if, if, if you're a brand and you're a product, you're not on those places, you're pretty much, you know, not even in the race.

Tom Raftery:

Good morning, good afternoon, or good evening, wherever you are in the world. This is the Digital Supply Chain podcast, the number one podcast focusing on the digitization of supply chain, and I'm your host, Tom Raftery. Hi everyone. And welcome to episode 300, 300. Wow. Incredible. Anyway, welcome to episode 300 of the digital supply chain podcast. My name is Tom Raftery, and I'm delighted to be here with you today. Sharing the latest insights and trends in supply chain. Before we kick off today's show. I'd like to take a quick moment to express my sincere gratitude to all of our amazing supporters. Your support has been really instrumental in keeping this podcast going. And I'm really grateful for each and every one of you. If you're not already a supporter, I'd like to encourage you to consider joining our community of like-minded individuals who are passionate about supply chain. But becoming a supporter. You'll not only be helping me continue delivering high quality content. But you'd also be part of something truly special. Supporting this podcast is easy and affordable with options starting as low as just three euros. That's less than the cost of a cup of coffee. And your support will make a huge difference in keeping the show going strong. To become a supporter, simply click on the support link in the show notes of this or any episode. Or simply visit. Tiny url.com/d S C pod. Now without further ado, I'd like to introduce my special guest today, Nick. Nick welcome to the podcast. Would you like to introduce yourself?

Nick Bartlett:

Thanks a lot Tom. Nice to be here., my name's Nick Bartlett. I'm the director of C B I P Logistics. We are a Hong Kong based 4PL logistics provider. Trading since 2015 and here today to talk about all things e-commerce, logistics, and the complexities that we're facing in, across some of the supply chain at the moment.

Tom Raftery:

Nice. Nice. And that's a very strong Hong Kong accent you don't have there Nick

Nick Bartlett:

it's very strong. Tom. People tell me just how local I sound all the time. Um, no. Uh, originally hail from a small country in the South Pacific. Uh, New Zealand. Uh, we've been up, up in Asia for, for a decade now or so, and, um, what, what, what was initially a bit of a, a backpacker's trip when I was in my mid twenties, has kind of turned into a fully fledged, enterprise with two kids, married. Um, so, so life's sort of really taken a different turn, but unfortunately my accent has, uh, has not left me

Tom Raftery:

No harm. No harm. I live in Spain and I haven't picked up the Spanish accent yet either. So we're we're good. Tell me a little bit about CBIP Nick.

Nick Bartlett:

Sure. Yeah. So look, um, we, we started CBIP Logistics in, in 2015 off the back of, um, kind of having a bit of a stall with, with our corporate lives. Me and the other founder who's actually another Kiwi, ironically, uh, we we're both up here and, and sort of living, uh, living the corporate dream or where you think it is un, until you realize that actually it's, um, it's pretty tough and pretty stale. And, and we both were really interested in doing something different, and invested into a small, a small little business here that was effectively doing freight aggregation. And we sort of started that as a bit of a side hustle. And then we, we really quickly were really keen to let go of our corporate careers and, and kind of started to build a real passion and desire to build something different, uh, in the logistics industry, particularly what we were seeing outta China and Hong Kong was that there was all this growth heading towards, particularly in the context of e-commerce. And we just felt like the, the industry wasn't ready for it. We, we felt like, uh, you know, it's a very fragmented, traditional, transactional based industry. And we felt like there was a real chance to, to build a different type of logistics model, uh, a model that was centralized around giving customers options. Uh, one that was, was digitally heavy, sustainably focused, um, and obviously was being built more for the age of the brands that were coming through the, um, through the pipeline versus maybe the more traditional companies that had always relied on the traditional logistics providers out of Asia. So since since 2015, we've, we've been trading as a 4PL. As of today we, we have over 55, uh, global vendors that we work with right across freight forwarding, warehousing, fulfillment, um, international and local domestic delivery, and a team of about, uh, 25, uh, permanent, um, FTEs. And then around another 150 people that work on our projects through our subcontractor vendor pool. Um, so, you know, a decent size number of people that are working across the, uh, the jobs that we are servicing for our customers.

Tom Raftery:

Nice. Nice. And what kind of customers are they and what kind of problems are you solving for them?

Nick Bartlett:

Yeah, so which we we're working, uh, predominantly with e-commerce, companies. So those, those, those, these are the companies that are producing products, uh, in the east predominantly. And then selling through either, um, multiple or, uh, single digital sales channels. Uh, we do often also serve as sort of the hybrid businesses. So hybrid brands that also might sell into, say for example, a retail, like a big box retailer. But also have a really strong online presence. And, and fundamentally what the problem that we're solving for these particular brands are is that their requirements these days are very different to what the traditional side of the industry has been able to, to service. So if you look, sort of look back over the last decade to two decades, you sort of see a very progressive, you know, very infrastructure, heavy based, uh, logistics industry that has supported, retail business, you know, in, in our category of products. That has shifted so drastically and so quickly that the industry has not really kept up. And of course you have many providers from courier companies to warehouses, but really there isn't any vendors or providers in the market that are bringing e-commerce logistics specific expertise to the table. And when I say expertise, I'm talking about things like warehouse layouts to handling returns, to picking individual SKU items versus, you know, just a pallet, for example. You know, the actual physical operational handling is significantly different. And the industry really wasn't up to that. And so what we've done is we've built a business by bringing in a whole bunch of different vendors that have got strengths in their own rights, and then we've effectively deployed solutions inside our vendors, and working with them sort of collaboratively to, to service the, the new requirements of what we call the new type of customer. And the new customer in our industry is, is e-commerce brands. And, and they're now making up a really big chunk of, of what traditional businesses used to do. It's now sort of effectively new, a new type of customer for them. Cuz the old, you know, the old sort of business they used to do is, is effectively dried up or, or changed.

Tom Raftery:

Yeah, I mean, we saw a huge rise in e-commerce with lockdowns and covid, and is that going to continue or is that a flash in the pan? Are people gonna go back to traditional shopping or do you think e-commerce is here to stay?

Nick Bartlett:

Oh, look, certainly e-commerce is, is here to stay. Um, certainly the pandemic accelerated things like no one would believe, but, but I guess that's what happens when you put a whole bunch of people stuck in their houses, lock the doors and no one can go anywhere. Right? The first place they turned to was their iPhones and I, I, I think just it was a really natural, organic kind of consequence of, of, of the pandemic. Um, so whilst, uh, it definitely was a bit of a flash in the pan in terms of demand, um, certainly demand is, is softened as has softened going into the back end of last year and, and already at the start of this year. But certainly we're gonna continue to see this category increasing. Maybe not quite at the same exponential rate as it has been, but um, but we continue to sort of make a slower trajectory into it in terms of its growth, you know, which I think this year's predicted to about 265 million Americans will shop online this year, you know, with a population of 340 million. That's a pretty good percentage. And, and that also just sort of tells you that I think, you know, behaviors have changed off the back of, um, the pandemic, sort of enforcing different behaviors, you know, maybe once upon a time. The boomer generation may have gone to the store and during Covid, they, they now realize the power of Amazon. And, and they've gone, ah, you know, I don't need to go to Walmart as much as I used to. Or, you know, I've sort of changed my own habits as a result of being kind of forced into that circumstance. Certainly the, the e-commerce landscape is becoming more competitive. Um, you know, there, there's obviously a lot more competition, uh, right across all the different types of product categories that, that we service. This year, we're seeing a whole bunch of different approaches being taken by the brands to sort of now figure out how they differentiate themselves. Um, I, I guess it's a bit like what happened in the retail segment. You know, it was all about getting your, your product on, on, on the shop floor and if you were an early stalwart of that, uh, you got, you had a very good tenure, right? Um, but what's happened at the time is that what, what you see on the shelf keeps changing. And that's all driven by the fact that more and more brands have joined that retail floor to try and get their products on those shelves. And, and e-commerce is, is no different. Um, you know, someone that was selling, uh, rugs or t-shirts, there's now, you know, hundreds of thousands of other brands trying to do the exact same thing to compete with these guys. It's still, it's growing, but, but certainly, um, maturing and, and getting more densely competitive as well.

Tom Raftery:

and what kind of steps were they taking to differentiate?

Nick Bartlett:

Yeah. So, so we're seeing, um, some really interesting strategies this year. Um, I think, you know, one of the perceptions with, when you have an economic downturn or, or what's being perceived as one. You know, I'm not necessarily a believer that the downturn is exactly as it's been described. Um, but you know, what we've seen as a result of that is, is the softening of volumes already. Right. And so businesses are applying a few different things. We're seeing quite a few businesses in our portfolio that are now, um, really actively seeking new market expansion quickly, so reaching new customers that they wouldn't have otherwise reached. Um, we're seeing customers adopt, a more sort of focus on other sales channels, so, so not just necessarily relying on their, maybe they're one or two core sales channels such as like an Amazon or a Lazada. They're actually now focusing on, you know, for example, uh, the Shopifys, the Magentos, maybe they're going into other marketplaces and other jurisdictions. Uh, for example, they might enter into Southeast Asia, or they might enter into, say, for even listing themselves on a retail marketplace like, like Walmart, which they may not have done historically. We're also seeing obviously the rise of, um, you know, the social mediums and, and the likes of TikTok and, and how these kind of, you know, millennial based platforms are influencing how people purchase. And really, like if, if, if you're a brand and you're a product, you're not on those places, you know, you're pretty much, you know, not even in the race. So that'd be kind of the, probably the, the three, four key things we're seeing this year. I mean, you can look at things like payment. Uh, there's quite a bit of payment, uh, adjustment, I guess being made in terms of offering customers more payment options to increase basket sizes through the likes of installment payment, uh, options or just other payment gateways such as, you know, WePay, WeChat Pay, or Apple Pay, or whatever it might be, to sort of just, I guess, try and further get better reach with, with more potential customers that might be using different payment methods for their digital purchases.

Tom Raftery:

Interesting. And you mentioned at the start, digital and sustainability as well as a differentiator. Talk to me about that. What role does sustainability play?

Nick Bartlett:

Yeah, so for us, we kind of made a really active decision to say if we're gonna enter in into an industry that is heavily, uh, as a heavily um, driven carbon contributor, then we also have to take a position as a business to support both our suppliers that we are using. But also to represent what we know e-commerce brands and customers are looking for, which is not just sustainability in terms of planting a tree. It goes much more beyond that, right? I think 90% of brands' environmental impact comes from their supply chain. Um, that's a stat that I, I read recently. And, and if you look at that and you say, okay, well hey, if I'm selling, you know, iPhone cases and 90% of my emissions are coming from producing it and shipping it, warehousing it, and delivering it to customers. Then surely, and my customers are telling me that they want to purchase from a sustainable brand. Then of course, um, we need to make a decision around how we best be part of that solution. So what we've done is we took it a really active decision to say we'll be a fully carbon neutral provider. So we're the only 4PL, so in the, in the context of the industry, you know, we are a 4PL operator, which means that we sit above the providers and we work with a really wide range of providers across all of those services that I mentioned earlier, and we effectively offset every piece of the activity that we do right across our supplier pool. So if you would traditionally work with, maybe with a courier company, for example, and they say we offset the the shipments, then, then that's cool, but that's only one part of the process. Uh, that's, that's not the whole part, right? So we've said, let's go as far up the chain as we can. Let's, be the leader in this space, particularly in our operating model, you know, as, as our operating model, um, provider to, to be the leader in the sort of sustainability offsetting, and then hopefully we can get to a carbon positive position rather than just being neutral in the long run. That's certainly the position on that and, and we're finding that as soon as we have these conversations and we show customers the framework that we've built, the policies that we've derived from the support of our, um, sustainability consultancy. And how we're offsetting and the projects that we're investing into as a result of our offsets, it, it makes it a lot more real. It can be deemed as a marketing activity. Um, but certainly for us it's much more than just, um, the benefits that it prevents from a, I guess, a brand, our, our brand perspective. But, but it's also actually just what's the right thing to do. And the right thing to do is like, if you fly, you know, hundreds of thousands of miles a year. Um, and there's a chance at the checkout to purchase a carbon offset for your flights. The the right thing to do is to, to purchase the offset in our opinion. So, so we've effectively taken that kind of mantra. Uh, you know, Chris and I both have young kids, um, you know, safe to say that they're gonna grow up in a really different world to the one that, that we did. And, and Chris and I both from a really pristine part of the world. And even we've seen changes in that landscape during our lifetime and I think if there's something we can do to kind of leave a slightly more positive mark, but importantly, giving our customers a chance to also be part of that and then tell their customers, then it's this whole kind of, circular strategy that we're, we're trying to adopt and, and put that, put that in place. A a as for the digitalization, um, you know, this is obviously a, a really big sticking point in logistics. It doesn't matter who you talk to. You know, people work off Excel spreadsheets, WhatsApp messages and emails and Oh, honestly, mate, it's an absolute, um, you know, when we first got into it, it's just a disaster. So, y you know, we, we, we sort of said that we have to stand for, for being digitally led. We have to stand for working with the, be very best technology and available in the market. And we have to, um, put it all together so our customers have got exactly what they get if they book on Airbnb or they book on, um, you know, Skyscanner or whatever it might be in terms of their transparency, pricing, tracking, and giving customers a real sense of that o of that journey that they're on with their provider. Cuz at the moment it's just, it's just so much smoke and mirrors and, and it's a real pain point and that's certainly part of the, the problem that we're trying to solve. Um, now there are lots of providers in our industry that are really strong when it comes to, to digital commitment. But they're all very stigmatized. So, for example, you have the likes of Flexport who are very digitally advanced and are thought leader, but, but they're also just a freight forwarder. Then you've got, you know, the courier companies that have got good integration for facilitation of last mile delivery, but, but they don't do anything else outside of that. So the idea is that we're, we're trying to really be that bridge and, and be the control tower, um, the central vendor, whatever you kind of wanna call it, to, to present all of those different data points into one place. And, and that's something that we are having some, some really good success with. And it's still very much a work in progress, but we're certainly a lot more progressive than, uh, I'd be confident to say than 98% of the rest of the industry and e even the way that we run our customer service, for example, you know, everything is done through Slack channels and, um, you know, ticket systems and, you know, just, just, just stuff that you, you expect these days. But you know, most providers are still working off email and, you know, hoping someone will respond. So we're, we're just trying to change, change that, and I guess that's how we're trying to solve those two. That's how we're bringing those two particular aspects of our offer, uh, digitalization and sustainability to, to our operating model.

Tom Raftery:

The use of offsets can be controversial, I guess. Uh, some offsets are better quality than others. How do you decide which offsets to, to buy into?

Nick Bartlett:

So it's a good, good question, really. So we work with a, a third party consultancy called the North Pole. They're a supply chain, are there, they're a sustainability consultant, uh, that specializes working with, with supply chain businesses, you know, like big, big brands. And we work with them because they had the widest range of offset opportunities or offset projects that we could, we could get involved with. So you're dead, right? Um, it can be a bit hit and miss and it can have a bit of a, uh, bad perception, but, but we've focused on, on reinvesting where we have our biggest carbon contribution to the planet. So, uh, for example, we do a lot of work in Vietnam, so we're investing quite actively back into projects in Vietnam. Now all of the projects, all of the carbon, um, purchases that we make that go into physical projects that, that, that create the offset, um, effectively are vetted by South Pole. And they sort of go through a really rigorous due diligence process. And, and we sort of have got full trust in that process with them and, and they've got a very tight framework to ensure that the quality of those offsets are of the highest standard. Um, because it's, it's sad that something so important is greenwashed so badly. But on the flip side, it's so great that the world has come so far in this conversation, right? it's, it's kind of, it's like, it's, it's, there's, there's a cost for everything is kind of what it is, kind of what it tells you, right? It, you know, look at, look at e-commerce, right? The cost of e-commerce has been convenience. It's great, but actually, hey been pretty bad on environment cuz we've had courier companies dumping parcels that they haven't been able to deliver. And I, I mean the, the, the flow down affects the negative side of the, of the equation is often forgotten. Which is sort of sad in some senses, but also progressive, that we're actually making progress like this,

Tom Raftery:

Mm. Yeah. And did you say they're called the South Pole or the North Pole Agency?

Nick Bartlett:

uh, sorry, sorry. South South Pole. South Pole Agency. Yeah.

Tom Raftery:

Good, good, good, good. good.

Nick Bartlett:

Based out of, based out of Singapore,

Tom Raftery:

Okay. Singapore. Great. I had a, a guest on the podcast recently, RJ Romano, just last episode actually. And we were talking about the shift in manufacturing and how organizations are starting to nearshore something that had been talked about for a while, but according to RJ who works for BDO, this is actually starting to happen now. So that's your neck of the woods . Uh, are, are you seeing an impact of that?

Nick Bartlett:

Yeah, so I definitely think we we're definitely seeing it playing out. Um, we're seeing a lot of businesses adopt this kind of China plus one strategy, which is predominantly keeping some production or, or predominance of their production in the east. And then either redeploying it to another Eastern market. We've seen a lot of really good progress, and demands being built up for the non-traditional production market. So, for example, Vietnam has, has really proven in the last sort of three to five years, just, just how competitive it can be, uh, when it comes to production. And, and we are seeing a lot of businesses, I guess de-risking a little bit. And so that sort of strategy around where you produce is is definitely softening in terms of its reliance on China with businesses sort of deploying this kind of China plus one, whether that be plus one in the region or plus one maybe closer to home. And I think, you know, COVID for me was the, was the real kicker, right? It was like everything that should have happened happened altogether at the same time. And it was a pretty extraordinary set of circumstances. If you look back on that and you know, this whole, you know, all your eggs in one basket strategy is, is is definitely not one that the big boys, you know, I think the big manufacturers, um, want to be sitting around a boardroom, um, saying, Hey, we've got all our production in, in China and we have another Covid, we have another perfect storm of, of everything that shouldn't go wrong, going wrong. And we, and we get hemorrhaged like we did, uh, not only from a supply perspective, but from a freight point of view, from lead times. You name it, it was going on. So I think, this, this sort of migration away from the market that we've all once known to be the dominator is, is still very much a dominant market, but, but we are seeing some really good spread across the region and, and also people producing, uh, closer to home as well.

Tom Raftery:

So I guess to your point, the, the, all the eggs in one basket strategy is never a good idea for anything. So spreading the risk is always and And Covid. And Covid, the Covid zero policy that China had really, I guess, brought it home to everyone, yeah?

Nick Bartlett:

Yeah. A absolutely, and I, and I think it's not just applicable to production, but it's it's proven to be applicable to almost anything in anyone's business, right? If you look at the other facets of logistics, one of the reasons I think our business did so well in the last few years is, is not because of the high, the high rates that were in the market. It's, it's because we were offering many options under our service umbrella. So, you know, we saw massive congestion with the couriers out of China during peak Covid. We were able to turn on 4, 5, 6 different courier options within a matter of days for our customers. And that's all about sort of that, that contingency and de-risking. And as a result, you know, I, I think, you know, if you, if you look at sort of saying not having all your eggs in one basket, it's probably applicable to your logistics providers, right? Uh, it's applicable to, your banks, uh, it's applicable to your insurance companies. I, I mean, it's, um, it's, it's a really good lesson, in, uh, not spreading yourself to thin, but, but also giving yourself a bit of protection in the event that this crazy set of circumstances, plays out again. And if, if it, if it ever does, I'm not sure if it ever will, but , I hope not, but, but yeah.

Tom Raftery:

Yeah, I, I, I hope not. But the, the, the linkage between pandemics and climate change has always been there, and it, it had always been predicted amongst, uh, climate scientists that the rise of pandemics would be more likely to happen. So, I guess if it's more likely to happen, it might happen more than once. So we, we've had one that there could hopefully not, but there could, could be another ans let's, let's hope not. So Nick, have you got any, you know, customer success stories you can speak to? Any wins that you can talk about?

Nick Bartlett:

Yeah. Yeah. So I think, you know, I was sort of thinking about this, what a good example is that sort of, I guess, profiles our operating model as a business. But, but also something everyone can kind of relate to. So, so a case study that we, or a piece of business that we've worked on for the last five years is Deliveroo, the, the food delivery company. Now, not a lot of people would probably associate that they'd have many logistics. Um,

Tom Raftery:

Mm.

Nick Bartlett:

Logistics are sort of requirements outside of them delivering the food, which is obviously something they control themselves. But Deliveroo is a pretty complicated sort of business in the sense that they have a number of different facets to their business, um, and quite a deep supply chain from producing all the apparel that the riders ride around them to producing all of the restaurant equipment and, and, uh, tablets to stickers that go on windows to menus. Um, right, right through to other, some of their more special projects, such as, um, they've got a project, uh, here in Asia called, um, additions, which is effectively like, uh, ghost kitchens. Uh, so they have a whole bunch of, you know, equipment for ghost kitchens that need to be set up. So, so they came to us about five years ago and, um, had some requirements here in Hong Kong for doing, uh, restaurant, fulfillment and delivery just, just locally in the market here. So we started supporting them with, with that, I think in those days it was about maybe three or 400 delivery points. Um, now we're at sort of around 5,000 delivery points, as we're sort of growing with them. But, but what sort of happened with, with that relationship is, was we started in a really small kind of, this is how we can help capacity. And over the last five years, we've, we've now built out a full regional sort of logistics program for them, which includes, uh, forecasting and replenishment, uh, of their inventory from China across their rider and restaurant uh, operations, uh, includes warehousing fulfillment in four markets from the Taiwan, Australia, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Includes integrations, uh, with all of their respective, uh, online stores where people can order, restaurants, can order things, and riders can order things. To all of the actual physical order management, and then right through to the delivery of, of, of all those different products across retail sites, um, commercial sites and to consumers, to, to, to the individuals that work for the business. And, and as a result of kind of that sort of, it's a really good example of, of where the industry has, or where Deliveroo has, has leveraged, um, a vendor that has tapped them into, we use about six different vendors to deliver this work for them. Six, six to eight different vendors. So it's sort of, they've had the very best from, from an early, early day, I guess, because it's just started out relatively small and then it's sort of, it's grown organically, but it's sort of just to prove sort of the value that's been created as a result of, of working with a regional customer like that. Um, and we've as a result, sort of gone on to their, to their UK and to the European, uh, businesses as well, to, to offer sort of guidance and support to them on how they can replicate the model we've done here out in the east, uh, that back out to, to the western market. So, sort of that whole 4PL centralized model has, has been o of great sort of success to them. And good cost efficiency and easy to manage given they've just had to deal with us and, and not with the whole bunch of other people. And obviously gone through very significant growth, over the last, uh, five years. You know, like, like I said, from not much to, you know, literally thousands of thousands of deliveries, uh, at a month.

Tom Raftery:

Wow. Cool. Cool. We're coming towards the end of the podcast now, Nick, is there any question that I haven't asked that you wish I had or any aspect of this we haven't touched on that you think it's important for people to be aware of?

Nick Bartlett:

No, I, I, I think we've sort of covered most of the ground that we, we'd hope to set out to do. I, I think the key, key message for me is that, you know, we're in this industry to, to provide something different, um, to provide a different type of operating model and a, a different type of, solution for our customers and, potential clients that that may be out there. But, you know, I think if you're ever at a, at a loss end or, or your logistics is getting you down, um, you know, certainly, um, certainly know that there is, there is, there is help around the corner, whether it be from us or, or from anyone, uh, else. But the industry is, is really progressing. It is moving in the right direction and it is keeping up with, with what now is this ever-changing landscape of, of a new type of uh, logistics requirement in, in e-commerce and, and we're certainly looking forward to seeing more of what we can do while out here in the East and, and, and also in, in the West , with our operations there as well. But thanks so much for having me on, Tom. I really appreciate It's been, uh, been good to chat.

Tom Raftery:

Yeah. Great. And if people want to know more, Nick, about yourself or about any of the topics we discussed on the podcast today, where would you have me direct them?

Nick Bartlett:

So you can just visit us at cbsplogistics.dot com. We've got all of our information about, um, our digitalization product in terms of our digital products for, for managing your logistics right through to our sustainability policies. We've got loads of good content that we pump out every month, uh, on a range of different, uh, subjects, um, that are, I guess, industry relevant for both e-commerce brands and retail, retail brands as well, um, when you can check me out on, on LinkedIn or on Twitter as well.

Tom Raftery:

Okay, super. I'll put those links in the show notes so everyone has access to them. Great. Nick, that's been really interesting. Thanks a million for coming on the podcast today.

Nick Bartlett:

Thanks a lot Tom.

Tom Raftery:

Okay, we've come to the end of the show. Thanks everyone for listening. If you'd like to know more about digital supply chains, simply drop me an email to TomRaftery@outlook.com If you like the show, please don't forget to click Follow on it in your podcast application of choice to be sure to get new episodes as soon as they're published Also, please don't forget to rate and review the podcast. It really does help new people to find a show. Thanks, catch you all next time.

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